News Detail
Ignatian News Network’s “Pre-Prans with Ruthie” Cooking Show Features Jesuit Father Radmar Jao

December 20, 2013 — Jesuit Father Radmar Jao joined host Ruthie Blacksea, chef at the Jesuit Novitiate in Culver City, Calif., to whip up a few recipes for the Christmas episode of “Pre-Prans with Ruthie,” a cooking show on the Ignatian News Network.

Pre-prans, which is short for preprandials, refers to the Jesuit community-building tradition of sharing appetizers and drinks before dinner is served. In this video, Blacksea and Fr. Jao prepare Cayenne-Candied Bacon Bites, festive Flatbread Pizzas and Scandinavian Gløgg.

A new episode with Blacksea is produced each month. Blacksea, a niece and sister of two Jesuits, considers her ties to the Society of Jesus and Ignatian spirituality “lifelong.”

Fr. Jao also guest-starred in a Thanksgiving edition of “Pre-Prans with Ruthie” last month, which featured recipes for Sweet Potato and Sausage Skewers with Lemon Garlic Dip and High West Lemonade. [Source: IN Network]


Flatbread Pizza 


1 store-bought flatbread 
2 sweet yellow onions, thinly sliced 
2 TB butter or olive oil 
1 jar fig jam 
1/2 c. chopped walnuts 
3 ripe pears, sliced thin 
3 oz. gorgonzola cheese, crumbled 

Heat oven to 450. 

Saute onions in butter until caramelized, which should take 15 minutes or so. Meanwhile, spread a layer of fig jam onto the flatbread. Top with a layer of onions and walnuts, arrange the pears and top with the cheese. 

Put on top rack of oven for about 8-10 minutes.


Cayenne-Candied Bacon Bites 

1 lb. thick cut bacon 
2 tsp. vegetable oil 
1 c. packed light brown sugar 
3/4 tsp. cayenne pepper 

Preheat oven to 400. Line a baking sheet with lightly greased foil. 

Combine the brown sugar and cayenne in a shallow dish, mix well. Press one side of bacon firmly into spice to coat well. Arrange the slices onto the baking sheet, sugared side up. Sprinkle with any remaining sugar mix. 

Put a cooling rack on top of the bacon to keep it flat while cooking. 

Cook until bacon is crisp and bubbly, 15-20 minutes. DO NOT PUT ONTO PAPER TOWELS, THEY WILL STICK. 

(Adapted from Emeril Lagasse) 


Gløgg 

1 bottle dry red wine 
1/2 bottle port 
2 c. good vodka 
2 cinnamon sticks, broken in half 
2 oranges 

Put all into pot, give it a good stir, heat to almost boiling, reduce heat and let summer for an hour or more if you like. Strain and serve in mugs. 

Gløgg will keep on the stove, covered, for several days. 


Recent News

September 27, 2014 — Pope Francis celebrated a special liturgy of thanksgiving in the Church of the Gesù in Rome today to mark the 200th anniversary of the restoration of the Society of Jesus.

September 26, 2014 — This fall, at Jesuit schools nationwide, students, staff, family and friends came together to pray for God's wisdom and inspiration for the new academic year.

September 24, 2014 — Jesuit Father Rohan Tulloch serves as pastor St. Anne’s Church in Jamaica, his first assignment as a Jesuit priest.

September 24, 2014 — The provincials of the Society of Jesus in the United States invite all to participate in “Igniting our Values,” the prayer program for Lent/Easter 2015.

September 22, 2014 — Through Seattle University’s innovative Fostering Scholars program, nearly 50 foster children have received scholarships since 2006.

September 19, 2014 — With the approval of Father General Adolfo Nicolás, the New England Province and the New York Province of Jesuits will unite to form the USA Northeast Province on December 3, 2014.

September 17, 2014 — Today is the feast day of Saint Robert Bellarmine (1542–1621), a Jesuit who was one of the most important cardinals of the Catholic Reformation.

view all news

Search news

Publications
Since St. Ignatius bought a printing press in 1556, the Jesuits have been involved in communications. Today the Society of Jesus publishes a number of award-winning journals and publications. Click below to access our latest issues.

America - 9/15/14

America - 9/1/14

America - 8/18/14



Ignatius House Retreat Center
For almost 50 years, the Ignatius House Retreat Center has been open to individuals of all faiths seeking a closer relationship with God.