Posts Tagged ‘Jesuit Father Greg Boyle’

Jesuit Father Greg Boyle Receives University of Scranton’s Pedro Arrupe Award

Jesuit Father Greg BoyleThe University of Scranton presented its annual Pedro Arrupe, SJ, Award for Distinguished Contributions to Ignatian Mission and Ministries to Jesuit Father Greg Boyle, founder and chief executive officer of Homeboy Industries, on April 7.

“Fr. Boyle has compiled an admirable record of community service through his innovative work with gang-involved youth in Los Angeles. His work is a living example and inspiration of the Ignatian ideal of service,” said Jesuit Father Scott R. Pilarz, president of the University of Scranton.

In 1988, Boyle created Jobs For a Future (JFF) in an effort to address the escalating problems and unmet needs of gang-involved youth. Four years later, he launched Homeboy Bakery, which provided training, work experience and, above all, the opportunity for rival gang members to work side-by-side. The success of the bakery led him to establish additional businesses, and JFF became Homeboy Industries, an independent nonprofit organization, in 2001.

The Arrupe Award is named in honor of the late Jesuit Father Pedro Arrupe, the superior general of the Society of Jesus from 1965 to 1983. The University of Scranton instituted the award in 1995 to further its namesake’s vision by recognizing men and women for outstanding contributions in a wide variety of Ignatian-inspired ministries. For more information, visit the University of Scranton’s website.

Jesuit Father Greg Boyle Receives University of Scranton's Pedro Arrupe Award

Jesuit Father Greg BoyleThe University of Scranton presented its annual Pedro Arrupe, SJ, Award for Distinguished Contributions to Ignatian Mission and Ministries to Jesuit Father Greg Boyle, founder and chief executive officer of Homeboy Industries, on April 7.

“Fr. Boyle has compiled an admirable record of community service through his innovative work with gang-involved youth in Los Angeles. His work is a living example and inspiration of the Ignatian ideal of service,” said Jesuit Father Scott R. Pilarz, president of the University of Scranton.

In 1988, Boyle created Jobs For a Future (JFF) in an effort to address the escalating problems and unmet needs of gang-involved youth. Four years later, he launched Homeboy Bakery, which provided training, work experience and, above all, the opportunity for rival gang members to work side-by-side. The success of the bakery led him to establish additional businesses, and JFF became Homeboy Industries, an independent nonprofit organization, in 2001.

The Arrupe Award is named in honor of the late Jesuit Father Pedro Arrupe, the superior general of the Society of Jesus from 1965 to 1983. The University of Scranton instituted the award in 1995 to further its namesake’s vision by recognizing men and women for outstanding contributions in a wide variety of Ignatian-inspired ministries. For more information, visit the University of Scranton’s website.

Jesuit Receives Award for Gang Outreach

Jesuit Father Greg Boyle receives awardShare

Jesuit Father Greg Boyle received the 2011 Loaves & Fishes Award for Faith in Action, presented by Catholic Charities of the Archdiocese of San Francisco in March for his nearly 25 years of building what is now the nation’s largest gang intervention and re-entry program, Homeboy Industries in Los Angeles.

Fr. Boyle said he has never met anyone who was seeking something when he joined a gang. “They are always fleeing from something,” he said on March 4 at St. Ignatius Church in San Francisco. “There are no exceptions.”

Boyle’s career choice of working with the poor and the marginalized took shape when he joined the Society of Jesus and was confirmed when he worked in Bolivia after his ordination. He was then assigned to Dolores Mission Church in the Boyle Heights neighborhood of Los Angeles, ground zero for gangs in a challenged area.

In 1988, Boyle started a “Jobs for a Future” program at Dolores Mission, and, in 1992 he launched a business to employ former gang members, Homeboy Bakery. Today businesses include Homeboy Silkscreen, Homeboy Maintenance and Homegirl Café.

He said, “Hope is the antidote. The best delivery system of hope to kids who are struggling, especially younger ones, is a loving, caring adult who pays attention to them. That’s the way it works.” For more on Boyle, visit Catholic San Francisco.

Jesuit’s Anti-Gang Program Debuts Snack Products at Supermarket Chain

Homeboy SalsaShare

Jesuit Father Greg Boyle’s Homeboy Industries, an outreach program for gang members in Los Angeles, recently partnered with Ralphs grocery store chain to sell Homeboy chips and salsa. The products were the hottest-selling snack item at the 256 Ralphs deli sections across Southern California in early February.

Fr. Boyle said he was inspired by the late actor Paul Newman, whose “Newman’s Own” products funded nonprofit organizations. The products launched at Ralphs last month as part of an effort to revive Homeboy’s hard-hit finances.

“The aim is to expand the brand so that Homeboy becomes a household name and then a household idea,” said Boyle.

Proceeds go to funding Homeboy services such as tattoo removal and counseling.

“If we can increase revenue, we could fundraise less,” Boyle said.

Last year, Homeboy laid off about 330 people and nearly shut its doors when it couldn’t raise the $5 million needed to operate. Because of donations, “things have stabilized. We’ve brought back senior staff, about 100 jobs,” he said.

Read the full story on Boyle’s latest Homeboy venture at the Los Angeles Times.

Jesuit's Anti-Gang Program Debuts Snack Products at Supermarket Chain

Homeboy SalsaShare

Jesuit Father Greg Boyle’s Homeboy Industries, an outreach program for gang members in Los Angeles, recently partnered with Ralphs grocery store chain to sell Homeboy chips and salsa. The products were the hottest-selling snack item at the 256 Ralphs deli sections across Southern California in early February.

Fr. Boyle said he was inspired by the late actor Paul Newman, whose “Newman’s Own” products funded nonprofit organizations. The products launched at Ralphs last month as part of an effort to revive Homeboy’s hard-hit finances.

“The aim is to expand the brand so that Homeboy becomes a household name and then a household idea,” said Boyle.

Proceeds go to funding Homeboy services such as tattoo removal and counseling.

“If we can increase revenue, we could fundraise less,” Boyle said.

Last year, Homeboy laid off about 330 people and nearly shut its doors when it couldn’t raise the $5 million needed to operate. Because of donations, “things have stabilized. We’ve brought back senior staff, about 100 jobs,” he said.

Read the full story on Boyle’s latest Homeboy venture at the Los Angeles Times.