Archive for the ‘Medicine’ Category

Former Nurse Becomes a Jesuit Priest at Age 56

medinaAs a nurse, Joel Medina treated physical ailments. Now, he wants to treat spiritual ones.

After years working in health care, the 56-year-old has traded his scrubs for the collar of a Jesuit priest.

“I was interested in serving people,” Medina said. “I felt the call to do that by serving as a priest.”

Medina started his career in health care at age 19, working as a nursing assistant. He went on to become a registered nurse  and earned a bachelor’s degree in nursing from Wayne State University in Detroit. He then worked about 16 years off and on at the University of Michigan hospital.

That all ended nine years ago, when Medina applied to be a Jesuit and entered The Society of Jesus at Chicago-Detroit Province’s Novitiate at Loyola House in Berkley, Mich.

Friends and family said they weren’t surprised by the decision.

“We always knew (the priesthood) is where he’d end up,” said Medina’s sister, Linda Berkemeier. “He was sensitive and interested in theology. We were just waiting for him to do it.”

Read more about Fr. Joel Medina at mlive.com.

Jesuit Father Myles Sheehan Appears on CatholicTV

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Jesuit Father Myles Sheehan, Provincial of the New England Province of the Society of Jesus, recently appeared on CatholicTV to discuss his role as provincial and his vocation as a doctor with the hosts of This is the Day show. His interview begins at 15:09 in the video below.

Jesuit Answers the Call in Haiti

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Jesuit Father Bill Johnson was in the Dominican Republic when the earthquake struck Haiti on January 12. Fr. Johnson is the director for pastoral care at the Institute of Latin American Concern (ILAC) of Creighton University located just outside of Santiago. ILAC is a Catholic, Ignatian-inspired, collaborative health care and educational organization offering service-learning and immersion experience opportunities in dental, medical, nursing, pharmacy, law, physical therapy and occupational therapy for undergraduate and high school students, and also to faculty-led groups, medical/surgical teams and other colleges in the rural Dominican Republic.

When the call went out for help in the days after the earthquake, Johnson answered it by offering his services as a translator and as a helper to the Creighton medical team assembled to come to Haiti to provide emergency medical care to the wounded and critically injured.

Jesuit Fr. Bill Johnson (center) poses with Jim Jalovec (left) and John Ward (right) in front of Javolec's helicopter as they deliver supplies during relief efforts in Haiti.

Jesuit Fr. Bill Johnson (center) poses with Jim Jalovec (right) and John Ward (left) in front of Jalovec's helicopter as they deliver supplies during relief efforts in Haiti.

Johnson experienced another tragedy in the days that followed the earthquake when his good friend, Jim Jalovec, was killed while providing help during the Haiti relief efforts. Jalovec had phoned Johnson immediately after the earthquake in Haiti to offer the services of his helicopter in the relief efforts. Good Samaritan Hospital in Jimaní, Dominican Republic, where Johnson and Creighton University’s medical teams were working, invited Jalovec and his pilot, John Ward, to come and fly doctors and medicine into Haiti. Three days into their rescue efforts, they died when their helicopter hit a mountain on the foggy night of Feb. 4. Johnson presided at Jalovec’s funeral in Chicago and Ward’s in Ft. Myers, Fla.

In memory of Jalovec, ILAC is selling “Show Your Goodness” t-shirts to help the ongoing relief efforts in Haiti. All profits will be sent to the Jesuit Refugee Service in Haiti to help children suffering from the earthquake. The shirts can be purchased by visiting the showyourgoodness.com website.

Johnson shared his reflections with nationaljesuitnews.com on his time helping at Good Samaritan hospital in the days following the earthquake. You can read his reflections and see his photos by clicking below.

Read the rest of this entry »

Jesuit Brother Jim Boynton Helping Injured At Port-au-Prince General Hospital

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Br Jim Boyton

Jesuit Brother Jim Boynton holds an IV while firefighter/EMT Jeff Lang assists a little girl with crushed toes in the background.

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National Jesuit News is urging people to give to the Jesuit organization Jesuit Refugee Service to help those in Haiti.

To support JRS/USA’s humanitarian response to the emergency needs of the Haitian people, please click here to be directed to their secure website and choose “Haiti Earthquake Relief Fund.”

Or you may send a check to:

Jesuit Refugee Service/USA
1016 16th Street NW Suite 500
Washington, DC 20036

Checks should be made payable to “Jesuit Refugee Service/USA.”
Please clearly note “Haiti Earthquake Relief” in the memo field on the check.
 

 

“He Descended Into Hell” – Jesuit Brother Writes from Scene of Haitian Earthquake

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Member of Team Rubicon on the Ruins of the Jesuit Novitiate in Port Au Prince, Haiti

Members of Team Rubicon on the ruins of the Jesuit Novitiate in Port-Au-Prince, Haiti

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Jesuit Brother Jim Boynton, recently assigned to Haiti to work at a school, is now apart of the rapid response team of Jesuits and U.S. Marine veterans assembled to quickly get medical personnel and supplies into Port au Prince. Named “Team Rubicon”, the operation is privately funded and includes former servicemen from Iraq and Afghanistan who can can operate both as security personnel and as medics.

On Team Rubicon’s blog, Br. Boynton writes of his recent experiences in Haiti and dealing with the devastating aftermath. National Jesuit News is reaching out to Br. Boynton to continue to get updates from him in Haiti.

“He descended into Hell”….  I have said these words every time I have prayed the Creed at Sunday mass, or the rosary.  I have prayed these words often, but have never understood them until now.  The smell of stale death is something that until now I have only experienced in roadkill in Northern Michigan roads.  Usually a raccoon or a skunk, but never a person, and never many persons.  In the past 6 years I have had the honor to serve on numerous medical brigades to the garbage dumps of Guatemala and Honduras, but nothing I have ever seen or done prepared me for the sights of the last few days.  I am new to Haiti, and only arrived on November 1st to work in a school.  To be honest I was nervous about that, but a school in Haiti now seems no more daunting than a classroom at University of Detroit Jesuit High School, or St. Ignatius Cleveland, where I taught history for years.  What is daunting now is Haiti itself.  “Haiti cherie”, or “dear Haiti”, as this country is called by those who love her, is suffering.  The news may report that help is being sent from all over the world, but today we are 6 days past the quake, yet at our location we were the first foreign aid to arrive.  Most is bottlenecked in the airport.  The only other non-Haitians I saw today were reporters from Caritas, Germany.  One left his team to help us secure transportation for the wounded and in the end for ourselves.

“He rose from the dead”… is another part of the Creed so often prayed.  There is hope, there is a resurrection.  Good is stronger than bad.  Today the Haitians triaged themselves in an orderly fashion, the most wounded getting to see a doctor first, something that is difficult to attain in any American hospital on any given night.  The amount of gratitude on part of the wounded, their families, and strangers is overwhelming.  Today 4 times I flagged a car off the street to take vital cases to the nearest operation room.  Gas is over $25 a gallon, if available, but each time strangers said yes.  Our return transportation failed to arrive.  Strangers loaded us into two trucks to drive us to the other side of town, regardless of curfew, and regardless of looters.

“To give and not to count the cost”…. is from the prayer of St. Ignatius, the founder of my religious order.  Somehow through a strange course of events, I have found myself with a group of men who are living these words to their fullest.  In spite of the difficulties, the struggle for organization, and lack of everything medical, the team I am with is making an incredible difference.  After today’s work many will lose limbs, some may not walk, but others had the first chance at life in 6 days.

The motivations for each of us on this team is different.  I am here because of my faith in Jesus Christ.  If you share my faith, I would ask that you pray for the people of Haiti, and pray for the men I am with.  Please make both a prayer of thanksgiving, for the people of Haiti are beautiful, and the team is as well.

Brother Jim Boynton, S.J.

National Jesuit News is urging people to give to the Jesuit organization Jesuit Refugee Service to help those in Haiti.

To support JRS/USA’s humanitarian response to the emergency needs of the Haitian people, please click here to be directed to their secure website and choose “Haiti Earthquake Relief Fund.”

Or you may send a check to:

Jesuit Refugee Service/USA
1016 16th Street NW Suite 500
Washington, DC 20036

Checks should be made payable to “Jesuit Refugee Service/USA.”
Please clearly note “Haiti Earthquake Relief” in the memo field on the check.