Archive for the ‘Video’ Category

Jesuit Pilgrims Gear Up for MAGIS 2013 and World Youth Day

MAGIS logoIn less than a month, 2,000 young adults from around the world will gather in Brazil for MAGIS 2013, a Jesuit-sponsored immersion experience leading up to World Youth Day. Jesuit Father Mike Rogers, the national coordinator for MAGIS, says that anticipation has been building since Pope Francis, a Jesuit from Latin America, was elected in March. “Right now Brazil is expecting two and a half million registrations for World Youth Day and as many as five million to show up for his Mass,” says Fr. Rogers.

Jesuit pilgrims will gather in Salvador da Bahia, Brazil, on July 12 before breaking into groups to travel to numerous locations in Brazil, including the mountains near the Amazon River, the Brazilian Museum of Music in São Paulo and the Iguazu Falls, made famous in the 1986 movie “The Mission.”

According to Fr. Rogers, programs will focus on Brazil’s environment, learning about the different religions of Brazil and service projects in and around Rio de Janeiro, as well as pilgrimage opportunities.

Among the MAGIS pilgrims will be 200 college students from the United States, representing over half of the U.S. Jesuit colleges and universities, including Boston College, Canisius College, College of the Holy Cross, Fairfield University, Fordham University, Georgetown University, Gonzaga University, Loyola Marymount University, Loyola University Chicago, Santa Clara University, Seattle University, Saint Joseph’s University and University of Scranton.

Seattle University MAGIS group

Seattle University is ready for Rio! Photo courtesy Jason Welle, SJ, and Brittany Olival (bottom right). Photo via The Jesuit Post.

The group of 15 students, alumni and staff that will attend MAGIS from Seattle University told The Jesuit Post they are looking forward to experiencing their shared faith with people from around the world and praying with people from all kinds of backgrounds. They’re also excited about engaging in service during the MAGIS portion of the pilgrimage and “being around people who share [Jesuit] ideals of social justice,” says alum Andy Giron.

The Seattle University contingent is also eagerly awaiting the opportunity to see Pope Francis, who will make his first trip back to his home continent since his election.

“His example, the things he’s said and done, resonate more with people our age,” alum Michael Alcantara told The Jesuit Post. “The spirit is calling him and calling us into a similar space, and we’re meeting at the same intersection.”

Thuong ChuChe, a graduate student in pastoral counseling, said it was Pope Francis’ election that sealed the deal for her and her husband. “We had been praying about it, the finances were uncertain, but the pope’s election … we felt like that was it!”

Christ the Redeemer statueFr. Rogers has his own reasons to be excited about MAGIS: he will be going as a newly ordained priest. “It’s a real privilege. Right off the bat I’ll be exercising my priestly ministry,” he says. “It will be wonderful to experience the universal church in the context of Latin America.”

Fr. Rogers hopes that MAGIS participants come away with a deepened sense of spirituality — and open themselves to the possibility of a religious calling.

“My hope is that they’ll have a sense of belonging and collaboration with the Society of Jesus. First and foremost, I hope they encounter Christ, fall in love with the church and make wonderful friends. And, for some, this may be a place where they hear God’s call to a vocation.”

For more on MAGIS 2013, visit the Jesuit Conference’s MAGIS website and The Jesuit Post. For more on the meaning of “Magis,” check out The Jesuit Post video below.

Jesuit Discusses Faith in America on Morning Joe

Jesuit Father Kevin O’BrienJesuit Father Kevin O’Brien, vice president of mission and ministry at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C., recently appeared on the talk show Morning Joe, where he discussed faith in the United States. He addressed a recent Gallup Poll that found 77% of people said religion was losing its influence in the country. “I think what the churches, synagogues and mosques need to do is get back to the basics. In our case, to preach the Gospel and focus on what we’re most deeply about,” he said.

Fr. O’Brien said he takes his cues from Pope Francis. “His style … is really about getting back to basics. … He’s preaching the Gospel of Jesus Christ. He’s talking about the poor. He’s talking about helping people finding meaning in their lives. He’s inviting people to encounter Jesus and for the Christian that’s a very attractive message.”

Fr. O’Brien also addressed a 2012 Pew Forum survey that found 1 in 5 adults are not affiliated with any religion. Most described themselves as spiritual but not religious.

That’s a call for religious to listen to that longing of those people, according to Fr. O’Brien. “They’re longing for God. I think we do better when we listen first to what that longing is about and then share our tradition.”

As for getting people back into the church, Fr. O’Brien said it’s a call to humility. “The churches must be in a more listening posture: that is to invite and to welcome … I think the reason why Pope Francis has spoken to so many people across religious traditions is that he is a humble man and he’s in a listening posture.

“I think all of us in religion would do better when we listen first,” Fr. O’Brien said. “I think this pope is leading the way. Frankly, for me, he’s making me a better priest if I follow his example.”

Jesuit Superior General Says Pope’s Style is 100 Percent Jesuit

Jesuit Father General Adolfo Nicolás,Pope Francis is 100 percent Jesuit and his style shows it off, said the superior general of the Society of Jesus, Jesuit Father General Adolfo Nicolás, in a recent interview with Rome Reports.

“I think we’re already seeing signs. … On Holy Thursday, he told priests that a shepherd should smell of sheep. It’s a great image which speaks to the pastoral mission of clergy, be it bishops or priests,” Fr. Nicolás said.

Fr. Nicolás also said he believes that the election of a Jesuit pope won’t have any repercussions on the Society’s members:

“It’s very clear to us, nothing has changed, nothing. The pope is the person the cardinals chose among themselves because they think he can lead the church. So we obey and work with him with the same intensity as we had with other popes.”

Even though the vow of poverty has always been a basic tenet for Jesuits, Fr. Nicolás believes this idea has gained importance within the church.

“That Cardinal Hummes told the pope the same thing [“Don't forget the poor”], means that it’s part of the church now. And that’s a good thing. It’s good because St. Paul mentioned it in one of his letters: we have to move with freedom because we are free with Christ, but we must never forget about the poor. He said this was one of the signs of being a Christian,” said Fr. Nicolás.

Watch the Rome Reports video with Fr. Nicolás below.

Pope’s Letter to Jesuit Is Affirmation to Those on the Margins

Jesuit Father Michael Kennedy

Photo via The Tidings.

This past Holy Thursday, Jesuit Father Michael Kennedy, executive director of the Jesuit Restorative Justice Initiative, organized Jesuit novices to wash the feet of minors at a Los Angeles juvenile hall, following the lead of Pope Francis, who washed the feet of detainees at a juvenile detention center in Rome. The young people at the center in Los Angeles also wrote letters to the pope, and — much to his surprise — Fr. Kennedy received a response from the pope.

In the letter, Pope Francis wrote: “I was very moved to read the letters you sent to me from the young people of Juvenile Hall and to know that we were close to one another in spirit during the washing of feet on Holy Thursday evening.”

Photo of Pope Francis' letter to Jesuit Father Michael Kennedy.

Photo via The Tidings.

“When I read the letter from the pope, many feelings flowed through me,” Fr. Kennedy wrote in a reflection in The Tidings. “I thought of what Dorothy Day said when working at the margins: ‘To work with the poor is a harsh and dreadful love.’ Most of the time it feels like you are losing. Being at the margins brings its own isolation.”

Fr. Kennedy noted that in a simple letter, Pope Francis “affirmed that the choice to kneel down with a population that society has neglected is where we find God’s presence. With his gesture, he points to where we should serve. Rather than running away from those who are not healthy, we should run toward those who need healing.”

Fr. Kennedy said he realizes a letter will not change the day-to-day workings of being in marginalized places, but “it is a small sign of affirmation from the man at the head of our church. It embodies the Gospel’s message of forgiveness and healing, and it affirms that this is where God truly is.”

Read Fr. Kennedy’s full reflection at The Tidings website and watch the Ignatian News Network video on the letter below.

Jesuit Becomes Fifth Bishop of Oakland, Says He’s Inspired by Pope’s Vision of Church

Bishop Michael Barber

(CNS photo/Jose Luis Aguirre, The Catholic Voice)

Jesuit Father Michael Barber, 59, was installed as bishop of the Oakland Diocese on May 25 at the Cathedral of Christ the Light in Oakland, Calif.  Appointed by Pope Francis, Bishop Barber is the fifth bishop in the history of the diocese and the first Jesuit.

San Francisco Archbishop Salvatore J. Cordileone was the ordaining bishop of Bishop Barber, who succeeds him in Oakland. Bishop Barber was installed with his brother, Jesuit Father Stephen Barber, at his side. Another brother, Kevin Barber, served as a reader.

“People have asked me, ‘what is your vision as bishop?’ I would like to do for Oakland what Pope Francis is doing for the whole church,” Bishop Barber said.

“My vision is this: The priests take care of the people. The bishop takes care of the priests. And we all take care of the poor, and the sick and the suffering.”

Bishop Michael Barber

(CNS photo/Jose Luis Aguirre, The Catholic Voice)

He offered greetings to Gov. Jerry Brown, who had trained three and a half years as a Jesuit, before becoming governor of California, twice, and mayor of Oakland.

“Governor, I’m honored that you are here today, because on this day, only here in Oakland, in the state of California, in the United States of America, do you have a Jesuit bishop, to go with a Jesuit pope and a Jesuit governor.”

Bishop Barber’s career as a priest focused on education, with assignments including assistant professor of theology at Gregorian University in Rome; researcher and tutor at Oxford University in England; director of the School of Pastoral Leadership in the Archdiocese of San Francisco; assistant professor of systematic and moral theology and spiritual director at St. Patrick’s Seminary & University in Menlo Park, Calif.; and director of spiritual formation at St. John’s Seminary in Brighton, Mass.

Bishop Barber said that until three weeks ago it never entered his mind that he would be bishop of Oakland.

Bishop Michael Barber

(CNS photo/Jose Luis Aguirre, The Catholic Voice)

In his initial nervousness, he said he recalled that Archbishop Pietro Sambi, the previous apostolic nuncio, had told a priest who was nervous about being made a bishop: The Lord himself is going to be bishop of your diocese. You’re only going to help him.

“That’s what I’d like to do,” he said. “I’m helping our Lord here be the bishop of this diocese. I know I’m unworthy, but I do know one other thing: That for all eternity, in the mind of God, to be bishop of Oakland has been my vocation. With God’s help, and your prayers, and the love of Mother Mary, I intend to fulfill it.” [Catholic San Francisco]

Below is video of Bishop Barber’s remarks at the end of his episcopal ordination Mass in Oakland.