Archive for 2010

Jesuit Father Thomas Lawler Appointed Next Wisconsin Provincial

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Jesuit Father Thomas Lawler has been appointed to be the next provincial of the Wisconsin Province of the Society of Jesus. The appointment was made by Jesuit Superior General Father Adolfo Nicolás, and it will take effect in June 2011. Fr. Lawler will succeed Jesuit Father Thomas Krettek.

Fr. Lawler, 46, is the Vocations Director for the Wisconsin Province and will continue in that role until June. He is a native of Wauwatosa, Wis. and graduated from Marquette University High School in Milwaukee and the University of Dallas in Irving, Texas. He entered the Society of Jesus in 1987. After studies at Creighton University in Omaha and Gonzaga University in Spokane, he taught at Creighton Preparatory School in Omaha.

He studied theology at the Weston Jesuit School of Theology in Cambridge, Mass. and was ordained a priest in 1999.  He earned a degree in social work at Loyola University in Chicago, and then was missioned to work at the Sioux Spiritual Center near Plainview, S.D.  In 2005, he joined the province staff in Milwaukee as Assistant for Pastoral and Retreat Ministry, and he became Vocation Director for the province in 2006.

Jesuits Discuss the Use of The Examen during Advent

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For this spiritual season of preparation before Christmas, the Jesuits of the New England Province of the Society of Jesus have created a series of Advent podcasts. Jesuits reflect and meditate on the intersecting themes of Advent and Ignatian spirituality over these four weekly podcasts, which National Jesuit News will publish each week leading up to Christmas. The entire podcast series can be listened to here.

Week II – Using the Examen During Advent

God is at work at every moment of our lives, and calls us to respond. “The Examen” helps Jesuits to become more aware of God’s action in everyday life. Jesuit Fathers Jack Butler and Michael Boughton explain how the Examen works, and why it can be useful in Advent.

Presenters:

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Jesuit Father Jack Butler is the Vice President of Mission and Ministry at Boston College.

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Jesuit Father Michael Boughton is the director of the Center for Ignatian Spirituality at Boston College.

Jesuits Reflect on Advent in Weekly Podcast Series

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For this spiritual season of preparation before Christmas, the Jesuits of the New England Province of the Society of Jesus have created a series of Advent podcasts. Jesuits reflect and meditate on the intersecting themes of Advent and Ignatian spirituality over these four weekly podcasts, which National Jesuit News will publish each week leading up to Christmas. The entire podcast series can be listened to here.

Week I – Anticipating Joy

The week’s podcast features Jesuit Fathers Jack Butler, Vice President of Mission and Ministry at Boston College, Michael Boughton, director of the Center for Ignatian Spirituality at Boston College, and Robert Farrell, professor of English at Boston College, speaking about Ignatian Spirituality, Advent themes and practices, and “Anticipatory Joy.”

Presenters:

Butler_Jack Jesuit Father Jack Butler is the Vice President of Mission and Ministry at Boston College.
Boughton_Michael Jesuit Father Michael Boughton is the director of the Center for Ignatian Spirituality at Boston College.
Farrell_Robert Jesuit Father Robert Farrell is a professor of English at Boston College.

Jesuit Helps Build Much Needed University in War Ravaged Sudan

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With over four decades on the continent, Jesuit Father Mike Schultheis has devoted himself to providing Catholic higher education across Africa including stints in Uganda and  Tanzania. In the 1990s, he taught economics at the Catholic University of Mozambique, established its first graduate degree and founded a research and documentation center. He also was  the first president of the Catholic University of Ghana. All of his previous educational apostolic work led him to his latest initiative of opening the Catholic University of the Sudan two years ago.

With educational opportunities in Sudan being among the worst in the world and adult literacy below 30 percent, Schultheis realizes that the Catholic University of the Sudan is a critical component in moving the country forward after almost 25 years of civil war. The founding of the university also comes at a critical time for the nation as it prepares for a historic vote in 2011 to decide if Sudan stays united or becomes two countries.

The Catholic Bishops’ Conference established the Catholic University of the Sudan as a centerpiece of their national program to help the country recover from decades of violence, famine and mass displacement of people. The vision for the university and its development goes back even farther, to half a century ago, soon after Sudan’s independence from Britain in 1956. The idea for the university was discussed again when former Sudanese president Jafaar Nimeiry met with Pope John Paul II in Rome in 1983, just months before a civil war broke out in the county and dashed the university project yet again.

“The Catholic University of the Sudan, as a national institution, is a dream long deferred,” explains Schultheis. “

You can read more about the new Catholic University of the Sudan here. You can also watch the interview with Fr. Schultheis on the progress of the Catholic University of the Sudan produced by National Jesuit News last year when the school launched its second faculty of agricultural and environmental sciences in Wau.

Jesuit Discusses the Clergy and the Recession

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Jesuit Father Tom Reese, director of the Public Policy Program at Woodstock Theological Center in Washington, D.C., was recently a guest on Interfaith Voices, a religious news magazine on public radio.

The episode on religion and the recession explored how the clergy in the country are handling it: what they are preaching to congregations where many are losing their jobs and their homes.

Fr. Reese tells host Maureen Fiedler, “We have to reach out and remind people of God’s compassion and love. Because when you lose your job, you lose your sense of value. You feel powerless … Religious communities have to reach out to these people and say ‘No, you are still important, you are valued and loved by God.’”

You can listen to the audio broadcast below or by going to Interfaith Radio’s website.